Summer 2006 at the NC Museum of Art

All films are at 9:00 pm

*Box Office (919) 715-5923*

Complete concert information, ticket prices and map to the museum at: ncartmuseum.org

$3 general admission, NCMA members and children under 12 FREE. See NCMA website for details.

A summertime tradition for thousands of film lovers, the NCMA's Movies on the Lawn offers one of the Triangle's unique entertainment experiences! Bring a blanket and picnic, and enjoy a great film outdoors on the big screen. Guests are no longer allowed to bring any alcoholic beverages to Park Theater events. However, beer and wine will be available for purchase.

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June 3:

Good Night and Good Luck (2005) Directed by George Clooney. David Strathairn, Robert Downey, Jr., Patricia Clarkson. 93 min. PG

Crusading journalist Edward R. Morrow (Strathairn) refuses to be intimidated by anti-Communist bully Joseph McCarthy. Not a complete life-story, Clooney focuses on one man’s crisis of conscience and lenses it in luscious black and white. A PG rated history lesson, vital for the whole family.

June 9-10:

Pride and Prejudice (2005) Directed by Joe Wright. Keira Knightley, Matthew Macfadyen. 127 min PG

Keira Knightley is the best Lizzie Bennet ever in this first rate adaptation of the Jane Austen warhorse about an impoverished family brimming with marriageable daughters. While the novel must be condensed to accomodate the two hour run time, those sacrifices are justified by Knightly spritely performance. Dew-kissed English locations enhance this romantic classic.

June 17:

Junebug (2005) Directed by Phil Morrison. Alessandro Nivola, Embeth Davidtz 107 min. R

A snooty gallery owner with a yen for outsider art meets her new husband’s NC family, and becomes an outsider, herself. Winston Salem writer Angus MacLachlan has sympatico ear for Southerners, and his measured but enthralling rhythm creates unforgettable characters like Ashley, a pregnant chatterbox played by Amy Adams.

June 23-24:

Wallace and Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005) Directed by Steve Box and Nick Park.85 min G

Eccentric inventor Wallace, and his long suffering dog, Gromit’s Anti-Pesto pest control business lurches out of control. The larky Brit wit and rollicking visual imagination of Aardman Animation provide both laughs and thrills.

June 30:

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) Directed by Tim Burton. Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, Christopher Lee. (115 min) PG

Which do you crave, unlimited access to yummy chocolates or a loving family? Johnny Depp, pale, fluttery and dressed as a velvety Edwardian dandy, evokes not Gene Wilder’s creepy 1970s Willie Wonka, but the Wonka of Roald Dahl’s classic book. Alex McDowell’s production design, from Charlie’s crooked house to the Great Glass Elevator, is exceptionally imaginative and unburdened by heavy-handed CGI effects. Director Tim Burton loves old character actors; Christopher Lee makes a telling appearance as Willie, Sr., a dentist whose contempt for sweets makes their forbidden pleasures irresistible to his son. The Oompa-Loompas (they get a backstory, too, and rather than being enslaved, they choose to work for Willie Wonka) are all played by Deep Roy, whose gravity evokes that of Freddie Highmore’s thoughtful hero, Charlie. Danny Elfman’s parodic compositions (70s disco funk, late Beatles psychedelia) using Roald Dahl’s original lyrics, add giddy delight to the just dispatch of the four horrid golden ticket holders. John August’s script is coherent, with a real resolution, moderating Dahl’s apparent hatred for real children without compromising his demented charm.

July 8:

Crash (2005) Directed by Paul Haggis. Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Matt Dillon (113 min) R

Oscar’s Best Picture is a meditation on race, class and coincidence in the streets of modern LA. A great ensemble cast portrays a multiethnic population warped by fear but smoothed by the redemption of human kinship.

July 14:

Mad Hot Ballroom (2005) A documentary directed by Marilyn Agrelo (105 min) PG

A New York public schools program unleashes the inner Astaire in 5th graders from 60 schools across the city, as they tango, rumba and fox trot to glory (or not) in a citywide dance competition. Children are scene stealers, of course, but the real surprise is how their dancing really swings, and how it inadvertently civilizes them.

July 15:

Brokeback Mountain (2005) Directed by Ang Lee. Heath Leger, Jake Gyllenhaal (134 min) R

The Best Picture shoo-in that wasn’t reveals the secret, lifelong romance of two hunky bisexual sheepherders. Ang Lee’s camera caresses magnificent Western landscapes and the faces of the passionate leading men. A more or less conventional Hollywood weeper, Lee says his projected audience is exactly the same as for The Bridges of Madison County.

July 21:

Neil Young: Heart of Gold (2006) A documentary directed by Jonathan Demme (103 min) PG

Neil Young, 60, playing Hank Williams’ guitar and recovering from brain surgery, is lovingly filmed in Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium. Songs from his latest album, “Prairie Wind” and old favorites, reunite him with a lifetime of musical colleagues.

July 28:

Capote (2005) Directed by Bennett Miller. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener (114 min) R

Hoffman was the year’s Best Actor as Truman Capote, a perpetual outsider whose obsession with turning heinous crime into deathless prose reinvents nonfiction, even as he is devoured by his identification with a murderous döppelganger.

July 29:

March of the Penguins (2005) Directed by Luc Jacquet. 85 min G

The heroic annual trek of Emperor penguins across the Antarctic tundra to mate and raise a family makes a perfect family film. March provides stunning vistas of penguin survival amidst scenes of harsh beauty.

August 5:

Walk the Line (2005) Directed by James Mangold. Joaquin Phoenix, Reese Witherspoon (136 min) PG-13

The life and hard times of Johnny Cash, embodied in the haunted eyes and trembling sneer of Joaquin Phoenix. Reese Witherspoon, 2005’s Best Actress, joins him in a biopic that fuses Cash’s R n R, R n B and country soul.

August 11:

Match Point (2005) Directed by Woody Allen. Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Scarlett Johansson (124 min) R

Rhys Meyers chilly allure merges with Johansson’s lush sensuality as intrigue roils upper crust drawing rooms. Hitchcock would have loved this story of a rapacious social climber and the havoc he wreaks when a sweet love affair sours. Critics have labeled this Woody's return to form, but in fact, it is a delightfully ironic new direction.

August 12:

Psycho (1960) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles (109 min) PG-13

Sex, money and murder rule at the Bates Motel, in our annual Hitchcock birthday tribute. This chilling glimpse of an aw-shucks, knife wielding boy next door still makes blood run cold—right down the drain. If you haven't seen this for a while, or if you never have, you'll be surprised at how enduringly powerful this black and white Freud fest remains.

August 18:

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) Directed by David Lean. Peter O’Toole, Alec Guiness, Omar Sharif (227 min) PG

The desert vastness co-stars with O’Toole in this seductively romantic saga of a misfit British officer assigned to unite Arabs against the Turks in WWI. The magnificent photography and epic score fuse into a cinema event suitable only to the big screen.

August 25:

Godzilla (1954) Directed by Ishiro Honda. Akira Takarada, Takashi Shimura (98 min) in Japanese with English subtitles

Not a cheesy monster movie starring Raymond Burr, the original Gojira was a fire breathing metaphor of Hiroshima’s devastation and a meditation of how Japan brought the world’s nuclear wrath upon themselves.

“Godzilla was the most masterful of all the dinosaur movies, because it made you believe it was really happening.” –Steven Spielberg

“As crass as it is visionary, Godzilla belongs with—and might well trump—the art films Hiroshima Mon Amour and Dr. Strangelove as a daring attempt to fashion a terrible poetry from the mind melting horror of atomic warfare.”--J Hoberman

August 26:

King Kong (2005) Directed by Peter Jackson. Naomi Watts, Jack Black, Adrien Brody (187 min) PG-13

Jackson’s tender homage to the original giant ape saga adds superlative embellishments, including a breathtaking bronto chase. A mellow Black, action hero scribe Brody and empathetic beauty Watts head the affecting human cast. As a great admirer of the 1933 original, I approached this with great trepidation, but it is a work of great love and affection, if not an improvement on a masterpiece of imagination.

***

$3 general admission, NCMA members and children under 12 FREE. See NCMA website for details

A summertime tradition for thousands of film lovers, the NCMA's Movies on the Lawn offers one of the Triangle's unique entertainment experiences! Bring a blanket and picnic, and enjoy a classic film outdoors on the big screen. Note: as of July 1, 2004, guests will not be allowed to bring any alcoholic beverages to Park Theater events. However, beer and wine will be available for purchase.

All films are at 9:00 pm

*Box Office (919) 715-5923*

Complete concert information, ticket prices and map to the museum at: ncartmuseum.org